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The Elusive Balance

Many people cite non-monetary reasons for why they love their work. When they feel engaged they have satisfactory autonomy, a sense of mastery, and are able to learn new things. […]

Listen Loudly

Have you ever told someone about a problem you are having, or shared about a difficult experience, and they jump in and tell you exactly what you should do to […]

Stress Agility

When we experience stress, our reactions are primarily governed by the area of the brain which controls our fight or flight reactions – the amygdala. In addition, when stressed, the […]

The Elusive Balance

Written by Kelly Ho and Tasha Broomhall Balance Many people cite non-monetary reasons for why they love their work. When they feel engaged they have satisfactory autonomy, a sense of […]

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Blooming Minds eMagazine / Issue 12

Over the last few years I have been researching positive mental wellbeing during study for a Master of Psychology, and now a PhD. I have been reassured that there are […]

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Work while you walk

The perils of sitting for long periods Have you noticed how long you sit during a day? You’ve likely heard all of the reports in recent years about the perils […]

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Blooming Minds eMagazine / Issue 9

In this May 2018 edition of our eMagazine we focus on workplaces. In this edition we focus on the common issue we are seeing with many workplaces, and our community […]

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Blooming Minds eMagazine / Issue 8

In this edition of the Blooming Minds eMag we focus on helping the helpers. As our workplaces increase attention on mental health and wellbeing, it’s critical that we focus on […]

The tree of connection

The connections we have with others in terms of building positive relationships, as well as providing support in times of need, are fundamentally important to our mental health and wellbeing. […]

Workplace Change Ahead

How do we create training opportunities that are truly transformational? From a workplace perspective, a transactional approach to training can be both a waste of money
and even damaging in the long term. When budgets are tight, one of the early sacrifices is often the
training budget. Training is sometimes seen as a nice to have, rather than a need. Part of the problem
is that training is often transactional. People go into a training room, they learn skills, they go back to work and are expected to adopt the new skills often in isolation, and retention is mired by the busyness of their role and other distractions.

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Blooming Minds eMagazine / Issue 7

This edition of the Blooming Minds eMag focuses on transformational workplace programs. Transformational programs require a shift in thinking about training. It’s a move away from training that ticks boxes […]

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